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Cryptocurrency Markets Post Recovery in Weekend Trading Respite

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Cryptocurrency Markets Post Recovery in Weekend Trading Respite appeared first on CCN

Cryptocurrency markets are finally showing signs of life after enduring a difficult start to the year that wiped $120 billion from the market in recent days, dragging it down from $590 to $470 billion. At the time of writing, Bitcoin was up almost 8 percent to just under $9,000 over the past twenty-four hours, according to

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Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing appeared first on CCN

Lisk, which jumped 65% after listing on bitFlyer on Wednesday, posted a 20% boost yesterday after Huobi.pro also listed the altcoin. Lisk has clearly benefited after securing two exchange listings in one week. While Wednesday, Jan. 31, was brutal for the cryptocurrency markets, as bitcoin’s price fell below $10,000 and the cryptocurrency market cap entered sub-$500 million

The post Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing appeared first on CCN

Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing appeared first on CCN

Lisk, which jumped 65% after listing on bitFlyer on Wednesday, posted a 20% boost yesterday after Huobi.pro also listed the altcoin. Lisk has clearly benefited after securing two exchange listings in one week. While Wednesday, Jan. 31, was brutal for the cryptocurrency markets, as bitcoin’s price fell below $10,000 and the cryptocurrency market cap entered sub-$500 million

The post Lisk Price Jumps 20% On Huobi Exchange Listing appeared first on CCN

Those ‘Crypto Genius’ Ads Cost James Altucher $2.7 Million

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Those ‘Crypto Genius’ Ads Cost James Altucher $2.7 Million appeared first on CCN

“The face of bitcoin” — that’s how one recent article described James Altucher, the self-proclaimed “crypto genius” behind those online advertisements that seem to have stalked you since the first time you typed “Bitcoin” into Google. Altucher’s ads follow cryptocurrency enthusiasts everywhere. Twitter? Yes. YouTube? You betcha. Facebook? They used to — until the company

The post Those ‘Crypto Genius’ Ads Cost James Altucher $2.7 Million appeared first on CCN

Bitcoin is back above $9,000

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

bitcoin

  • Bitcoin collapsed as low as $7,700 on Friday before rebounding.
  • The cryptocurrency is recovering on Saturday and rallying above $9,000.


LONDON — Bitcoin is back above $9,000 on Saturday after a wild Friday.

The cryptocurrency fell as low as $7,700 on Friday, losing roughly 15% of its value at one point, before rebounding later in the session. Concerns have been building about regulation of cryptocurrencies and the role of cryptocurrency Tether in the market. Friday's collapse began after bitcoin broke below the psychologically significant $9,000 level.

Bitcoin has been hovering around the $9,000 level for most of Saturday morning in Europe but is rallying as America begins to wake up. The cryptocurrency is up 6% to $9,401.05 at 2.30 p.m. GMT (9.30 a.m. ET).

As usual, where bitcoin goes other cryptocurrencies follow and all of the 100 biggest cryptocurrencies are now in the green when measured over the last 24 hours, according to data provider CoinMarketCap.com.

Here's how the other major cryptocurrencies are looking on Saturday afternoon:

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Netflix is headed for a huge profit milestone in 2018

Bitcoin is back above $9,000

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

bitcoin

  • Bitcoin collapsed as low as $7,700 on Friday before rebounding.
  • The cryptocurrency is recovering on Saturday and rallying above $9,000.


LONDON — Bitcoin is back above $9,000 on Saturday after a wild Friday.

The cryptocurrency fell as low as $7,700 on Friday, losing roughly 15% of its value at one point, before rebounding later in the session. Concerns have been building about regulation of cryptocurrencies and the role of cryptocurrency Tether in the market. Friday's collapse began after bitcoin broke below the psychologically significant $9,000 level.

Bitcoin has been hovering around the $9,000 level for most of Saturday morning in Europe but is rallying as America begins to wake up. The cryptocurrency is up 6% to $9,401.05 at 2.30 p.m. GMT (9.30 a.m. ET).

As usual, where bitcoin goes other cryptocurrencies follow and all of the 100 biggest cryptocurrencies are now in the green when measured over the last 24 hours, according to data provider CoinMarketCap.com.

Here's how the other major cryptocurrencies are looking on Saturday afternoon:

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Netflix is headed for a huge profit milestone in 2018

Bitcoin is back above $9,000

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

bitcoin

  • Bitcoin collapsed as low as $7,700 on Friday before rebounding.
  • The cryptocurrency is recovering on Saturday and rallying above $9,000.


LONDON — Bitcoin is back above $9,000 on Saturday after a wild Friday.

The cryptocurrency fell as low as $7,700 on Friday, losing roughly 15% of its value at one point, before rebounding later in the session. Concerns have been building about regulation of cryptocurrencies and the role of cryptocurrency Tether in the market. Friday's collapse began after bitcoin broke below the psychologically significant $9,000 level.

Bitcoin has been hovering around the $9,000 level for most of Saturday morning in Europe but is rallying as America begins to wake up. The cryptocurrency is up 6% to $9,401.05 at 2.30 p.m. GMT (9.30 a.m. ET).

As usual, where bitcoin goes other cryptocurrencies follow and all of the 100 biggest cryptocurrencies are now in the green when measured over the last 24 hours, according to data provider CoinMarketCap.com.

Here's how the other major cryptocurrencies are looking on Saturday afternoon:

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Netflix is headed for a huge profit milestone in 2018

Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee appeared first on CCN

Cryptocurrency-fueled scams seem to keep Litecoin founder Charlie Lee up at night, based on a report in Business Insider. Lee, who is an alum of both Google and Coinbase, spoke about the speculative nature of bitcoin and other cryptocurrency investing, saying that it’s not “bad” but instead a “natural progression,” adding that he sees nothing

The post Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee appeared first on CCN

Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee appeared first on CCN

Cryptocurrency-fueled scams seem to keep Litecoin founder Charlie Lee up at night, based on a report in Business Insider. Lee, who is an alum of both Google and Coinbase, spoke about the speculative nature of bitcoin and other cryptocurrency investing, saying that it’s not “bad” but instead a “natural progression,” adding that he sees nothing

The post Litecoin to Complement Bitcoin as Payments Currency: Founder Charlie Lee appeared first on CCN

NIST Blockchain Report Examines the Tech Behind the “Hype”

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

NIST.jpg

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a report titled “Blockchain Technology Overview.” The report, intended to provide a high-level technical overview, discusses the application of blockchain technology to electronic currency in depth, and also discusses its broader applications.

“We want to help people understand how blockchains work so that they can appropriately and usefully apply them to technology problems,” said NIST computer scientist Dylan Yaga, who is one of the authors of the report. “It’s an introduction to the things you should understand and think about if you want to use blockchain.” According to Yaga, blockchain technology is a powerful new paradigm for business.

The very fact that it comes from NIST makes this report worth reading. NIST, a nonregulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, whose mission is to promote innovation and industrial competitiveness, is a high-profile agency of the U.S. government with programs that include Nanoscale Science and Technology, Engineering, and Information Technology.

“From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology,” notes the NIST website. Therefore, NIST recommendations are likely to shape not only the development of blockchain technology in the private sector, but also the U.S. government’s adoption and regulation of blockchain technology.

“Because the market is growing so rapidly, several stakeholders, customers and agencies asked NIST to create a straightforward description of blockchain so that newcomers to the marketplace could enter with the same knowledge about the technology,” reads the NIST press release.

“We want to help people to see past the hype,” said Yaga.

The NIST report is formally a draft, open to public comments from January 24 to February 23, 2018.

The authors note that many electronic cash schemes were proposed before Bitcoin, but none of them achieved widespread use. Bitcoin achieved compelling capabilities and widespread use because blockchain technology enabled electronic cash to be implemented in a distributed fashion without controlling bodies and single points of failure. Other blockchain technologies discussed explicitly are Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH, Multichain, Ripple and Hyperledger.

According to the authors, financial organizations are likely to be the most impacted by blockchain technology and may need to adapt or even completely change their practices. But emerging nonfinancial applications could prove even more important.

Ethereum, with its programmable smart contracts able to perform calculations and store information, is considered an enabler of next-generation, nonfinancial blockchain applications. For example, NIST researchers have created smart contracts that publicly generate trustworthy random numbers.

The NIST report mentions several nonfinancial applications of blockchain technology, including autonomous machine-to-machine transactions; smart buildings that autonomously trade excess renewable energy; public record keeping for land titles, marriages or births; supply chain monitoring and management; identity systems; and digital notarization services.

The report notes that practical quantum computers, which could be developed in the near future, would be capable of greatly weakening (and, in some cases, rendering useless) existing cryptographic algorithms. This could result in the need to change, or update, the cryptography technology used in today’s blockchain systems. The report provides a table, taken from NIST’s 2016 “Report on Post-Quantum Cryptography,” describing the impact of quantum computing on common cryptographic algorithms. In summary, RSA, Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECDSA and ECDH) and Finite Field Cryptography (DSA) should be considered as no longer secure. AES, SHA-2 and SHA-3 should use larger key and output sizes.

“Blockchain technologies have the power to disrupt many industries,” conclude the NIST authors. “To avoid missed opportunities and undesirable surprises, organizations should start investigating whether or not a blockchain can help them.”

However, the report warns that updating technology systems with users distributed around the world, and governed by the consensus of the users, could become extremely difficult. The fact that something recorded on a blockchain usually stays there forever, even when there is a mistake, can be a desirable feature for some organizations but a serious problem for others.

This article originally appeared on Bitcoin Magazine.

NIST Blockchain Report Examines the Tech Behind the “Hype”

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

NIST.jpg

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a report titled “Blockchain Technology Overview.” The report, intended to provide a high-level technical overview, discusses the application of blockchain technology to electronic currency in depth, and also discusses its broader applications.

“We want to help people understand how blockchains work so that they can appropriately and usefully apply them to technology problems,” said NIST computer scientist Dylan Yaga, who is one of the authors of the report. “It’s an introduction to the things you should understand and think about if you want to use blockchain.” According to Yaga, blockchain technology is a powerful new paradigm for business.

The very fact that it comes from NIST makes this report worth reading. NIST, a nonregulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, whose mission is to promote innovation and industrial competitiveness, is a high-profile agency of the U.S. government with programs that include Nanoscale Science and Technology, Engineering, and Information Technology.

“From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology,” notes the NIST website. Therefore, NIST recommendations are likely to shape not only the development of blockchain technology in the private sector, but also the U.S. government’s adoption and regulation of blockchain technology.

“Because the market is growing so rapidly, several stakeholders, customers and agencies asked NIST to create a straightforward description of blockchain so that newcomers to the marketplace could enter with the same knowledge about the technology,” reads the NIST press release.

“We want to help people to see past the hype,” said Yaga.

The NIST report is formally a draft, open to public comments from January 24 to February 23, 2018.

The authors note that many electronic cash schemes were proposed before Bitcoin, but none of them achieved widespread use. Bitcoin achieved compelling capabilities and widespread use because blockchain technology enabled electronic cash to be implemented in a distributed fashion without controlling bodies and single points of failure. Other blockchain technologies discussed explicitly are Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH, Multichain, Ripple and Hyperledger.

According to the authors, financial organizations are likely to be the most impacted by blockchain technology and may need to adapt or even completely change their practices. But emerging nonfinancial applications could prove even more important.

Ethereum, with its programmable smart contracts able to perform calculations and store information, is considered an enabler of next-generation, nonfinancial blockchain applications. For example, NIST researchers have created smart contracts that publicly generate trustworthy random numbers.

The NIST report mentions several nonfinancial applications of blockchain technology, including autonomous machine-to-machine transactions; smart buildings that autonomously trade excess renewable energy; public record keeping for land titles, marriages or births; supply chain monitoring and management; identity systems; and digital notarization services.

The report notes that practical quantum computers, which could be developed in the near future, would be capable of greatly weakening (and, in some cases, rendering useless) existing cryptographic algorithms. This could result in the need to change, or update, the cryptography technology used in today’s blockchain systems. The report provides a table, taken from NIST’s 2016 “Report on Post-Quantum Cryptography,” describing the impact of quantum computing on common cryptographic algorithms. In summary, RSA, Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECDSA and ECDH) and Finite Field Cryptography (DSA) should be considered as no longer secure. AES, SHA-2 and SHA-3 should use larger key and output sizes.

“Blockchain technologies have the power to disrupt many industries,” conclude the NIST authors. “To avoid missed opportunities and undesirable surprises, organizations should start investigating whether or not a blockchain can help them.”

However, the report warns that updating technology systems with users distributed around the world, and governed by the consensus of the users, could become extremely difficult. The fact that something recorded on a blockchain usually stays there forever, even when there is a mistake, can be a desirable feature for some organizations but a serious problem for others.

This article originally appeared on Bitcoin Magazine.

NIST Blockchain Report Examines the Tech Behind the “Hype”

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

NIST.jpg

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a report titled “Blockchain Technology Overview.” The report, intended to provide a high-level technical overview, discusses the application of blockchain technology to electronic currency in depth, and also discusses its broader applications.

“We want to help people understand how blockchains work so that they can appropriately and usefully apply them to technology problems,” said NIST computer scientist Dylan Yaga, who is one of the authors of the report. “It’s an introduction to the things you should understand and think about if you want to use blockchain.” According to Yaga, blockchain technology is a powerful new paradigm for business.

The very fact that it comes from NIST makes this report worth reading. NIST, a nonregulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, whose mission is to promote innovation and industrial competitiveness, is a high-profile agency of the U.S. government with programs that include Nanoscale Science and Technology, Engineering, and Information Technology.

“From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology,” notes the NIST website. Therefore, NIST recommendations are likely to shape not only the development of blockchain technology in the private sector, but also the U.S. government’s adoption and regulation of blockchain technology.

“Because the market is growing so rapidly, several stakeholders, customers and agencies asked NIST to create a straightforward description of blockchain so that newcomers to the marketplace could enter with the same knowledge about the technology,” reads the NIST press release.

“We want to help people to see past the hype,” said Yaga.

The NIST report is formally a draft, open to public comments from January 24 to February 23, 2018.

The authors note that many electronic cash schemes were proposed before Bitcoin, but none of them achieved widespread use. Bitcoin achieved compelling capabilities and widespread use because blockchain technology enabled electronic cash to be implemented in a distributed fashion without controlling bodies and single points of failure. Other blockchain technologies discussed explicitly are Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH, Multichain, Ripple and Hyperledger.

According to the authors, financial organizations are likely to be the most impacted by blockchain technology and may need to adapt or even completely change their practices. But emerging nonfinancial applications could prove even more important.

Ethereum, with its programmable smart contracts able to perform calculations and store information, is considered an enabler of next-generation, nonfinancial blockchain applications. For example, NIST researchers have created smart contracts that publicly generate trustworthy random numbers.

The NIST report mentions several nonfinancial applications of blockchain technology, including autonomous machine-to-machine transactions; smart buildings that autonomously trade excess renewable energy; public record keeping for land titles, marriages or births; supply chain monitoring and management; identity systems; and digital notarization services.

The report notes that practical quantum computers, which could be developed in the near future, would be capable of greatly weakening (and, in some cases, rendering useless) existing cryptographic algorithms. This could result in the need to change, or update, the cryptography technology used in today’s blockchain systems. The report provides a table, taken from NIST’s 2016 “Report on Post-Quantum Cryptography,” describing the impact of quantum computing on common cryptographic algorithms. In summary, RSA, Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECDSA and ECDH) and Finite Field Cryptography (DSA) should be considered as no longer secure. AES, SHA-2 and SHA-3 should use larger key and output sizes.

“Blockchain technologies have the power to disrupt many industries,” conclude the NIST authors. “To avoid missed opportunities and undesirable surprises, organizations should start investigating whether or not a blockchain can help them.”

However, the report warns that updating technology systems with users distributed around the world, and governed by the consensus of the users, could become extremely difficult. The fact that something recorded on a blockchain usually stays there forever, even when there is a mistake, can be a desirable feature for some organizations but a serious problem for others.

This article originally appeared on Bitcoin Magazine.

Bitcoin at $1 Million by 2020: McAfee Doubles Down on Bullish Bet

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post Bitcoin at $1 Million by 2020: McAfee Doubles Down on Bullish Bet appeared first on CCN

John McAfee, whose fame exists rather heavily due to the software company he founded in the late 1980s, took to Twitter yet again on February 2, 2018, to reaffirm that he was indeed bullish on bitcoin. In an attempt to predict bitcoin’s price at the end of this decade, McAfee had previously stated that it

The post Bitcoin at $1 Million by 2020: McAfee Doubles Down on Bullish Bet appeared first on CCN

Ripple's XRP Worst Hit By January Market Decline

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Large-cap cryptocurrencies may have had a stellar 2017, but 2018 hasn't been so kind – with several being worst hit.

Crypto Rich and Paranoid: Threats Prompt Radical Security in Bitcoin Land

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Cryptocurrency users who got rich in the run-up are now targets for robbers and kidnappers, not just hackers. That’s prompting a security overhaul.

How To Be a Bitcoin Thought Leader

Wired, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Yes, even you, with the 53 Twitter followers, could probably convince someone of your crypto clairvoyance.

PSA: No India hasn’t banned Bitcoin — but it’s still talking tough on crypto

TechCrunch, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

 Reports of the death of Bitcoin in India have been greatly exaggerated. Read More

The engine that has driven the British economy since the financial crisis could soon be its 'weakest link'

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Mechanic fixing a car

  • Credit Suisse's Sonali Punhani argues that the UK consumer could pose the biggest downside risk to solid growth in 2018.
  • "As inflation falls and real income rises, consumers can either increase their consumption or their savings," she writes.
  • If consumers decide to save rather than spend, it could be bad news for the broader economy.


LONDON — Britain's consumers pose the biggest downside risk to the country's economy in 2018, the UK economics team at Swiss lender Credit Suisse said in a note circulated this week.

Writing on Wednesday, Sonali Punhani, an economist at the bank, argues that consumer spending — which has been one of the main drivers of the UK's economic growth in the years since the financial crisis — now presents the "biggest risk" to Credit Suisse's higher than consensus forecast for GDP in 2018.

"In 2018 we expect Brexit-related headwinds to domestic demand to abate, and the economy to regain traction on strong global and European growth. We forecast growth of 1.8% in 2018, higher than consensus of 1.4%," Punhani writes.

"The biggest risk to our call of above consensus growth is the consumer."

Having risen above 3% late in 2017, driven higher by the weak pound in the aftermath of the Brexit vote, inflation is now widely expected to fall away fairly rapidly. That is expected to coincide with increasing wages for UK workers.

The combination of the two is likely to see real wages increase for the first time since early 2017, giving Brits more disposable income. What they do with that money could be crucial for the economy in the coming 12 months, Punhani argues.

"As inflation falls and real income rises, consumers can either increase their consumption or their savings. Our central scenario is that they will do the former in part because consumer confidence is improving. But the risk is they do the latter, in which case consumer spending will be subdued and will put downside risks to our growth forecasts."

Britain's savings rate fell sharply in the aftermath of the Brexit, with consumers deciding to keep spending, rather than saving money for a rainy day. This is thought to be at least partially down to the fact that more than half of the country's voting population saw Brexit as a material positive, and therefore saw no reason to alter their behaviour

Now the economic downsides of Brexit are become more real — growth is slowing noticeably for example — it could be that British consumers start to put more money away for a rainy day. This, Punhani argues, would be bad news for the economy as a whole.

Citing the Bank of England's unofficial blog, Bank Underground, Punhani writes (emphasis ours):

"Consumers don’t respond in the the same way to good and bad income surprises. Survey evidence finds that an unanticipated fall in income leads to consumption changes which are significantly larger than those associated with an income rise of the same size. Between 2011 and 2014 the annual NMG survey of households, commissioned by the Bank of England, found that an unexpected increase in income leads to an average rise in spending of just 14 pence for each extra pound (MPC=0.14), whereas spending falls by 64 pence for every pound (MPC=0.64) that household income unexpectedly decreases.

"This could limit the scale of real consumption growth we see when income growth picks up."

To be clear, such a slowdown is not Credit Suisse's base case. The bank believes ultimately that "rising incomes should support consumer spending this year." However, it is certainly something to keep an eye on.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A crypto expert explains the difference between the two largest cryptocurrencies in the world: bitcoin and Ethereum

This 25-year-old entrepreneur went from leaving school at 16 to running the 'Airbnb of retail'

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Ross Bailey CEO Appear Here

  • Appear Here lets businesses rent pop-up space and has been called the "Airbnb of retail."
  • The London startup raised $20 million last year and is currently planning international expansion.
  • CEO Ross Bailey sat down with Business Insider to talk department stores, skipping university, and how to maintain company culture.


LONDON — Ross Bailey wants to talk about department stores.

"If analysts walked around some of them I think they would be trading at less than 30% their net asset value," Bailey says, referencing the already bombed out US "mall" sector.

He whips out his phone and starts scrolling through pictures that illustrate his point — dreadful carpets, too much stock cluttered together, and bad paintings hung up near concessions.

"If you saw that in someone's house you'd think they've got bad taste," he says in his typically enthusiastic style.

Why does he spend his time photographing poorly designed department stores? "It's my passion."

Appear Here, which Bailey founded in 2012, is a startup trying to do for retail space what Airbnb did for hotel rental. Bailey spends his days engrossed in retail — both good and bad.

His platform lets people and brands rent "pop up" space across cities, letting aspiring entrepreneurs trial ideas like takeaway porridge stalls or designers launch capsule collections.

Over 1,000 spaces are listed by Appear Here in the UK, with 1,000 in New York, where it launched last year, and even more in Paris. Everyone from Google to Moleskin has used the platform to book space and Made In Chelsea star Jamie Laing used Appear Here for the launch of his sweet brand Candy Kittens.

Netflix (Black Mirror) 23 ©Appear HereBailey had the idea for the business while running his own pop-up. He quit school at 16 to move from his home in Buckinghamshire to London and was involved in several entrepreneurial endeavours before running a temporary fashion stall in Soho to coincide with the 2012 London Olympics.

He noticed that people were coming up to him to ask about he'd managed to secure the space — Under Armour even approached him at one point.

"There's a pricing issue in real estate," Bailey, now 25, says. "It's based on 10-year leases. That model doesn't work anymore. Now we're seeing rent is a variable cost, not a fixed cost."

Retail occupancy rates are declining around the world as traditional players grapple with the rise of e-commerce. Shops are closing, sales are down, and fewer people are visiting.

Real estate needs to move more towards a more flexible pricing model, Bailey argues, like Uber's surge pricing or how hotel prices rise when a conference is in town.

"If you can make 70% of your revenue in December, you shouldn't be saying the same price for the space in January when there are no sales," Bailey argues.

"A few years ago people said it was a stupid idea, landlords will never do it. Now it's a case of OK, this is definitely going to happen."

Ten of the biggest landlords in the US have signed exclusive deals with Appear Here, including Blackstone and Simon, the biggest mall operator in the US. (Bailey didn't say whether he'd critiqued their carpets.)Warner Brothers pop-up Appear HereAppear Here raised $12 million last year to go global and Bailey is currently scoping out a location for a new US office. Property VC Fifth Wall, which is backed by the likes of CBRE and Loewe's, has also invested an undisclosed sum and Bailey hints at another deal with a "fashion fund" that will be announced shortly.

It's all very impressive for someone still just in his mid-twenties. "Instead of uni, this has been my learning curve," Bailey says.

Six years on, what has he learned?

"I think I've definitely learned to delegate. You need to jump between high-level stuff and details."

Bailey logged 80 flights between London, Paris, and New York last year. He says he is always tired but it doesn't show — he is a whirlwind of ideas and opinions, talking a mile a minute. Towards the end of our conversation, though, a solitary yawn escapes.

"A big focus over the last six months was building out the exec team," Bailey says. Appear Here recently hired two execs from Uber to run the London and Paris offices. The company has also hired a new CTO and a new chief strategy officer.Kanye West pop up London Appear HereThe company has yet to file a set of full accounts, claiming small company exemption, but Appear Here says it has booking requests worth $110 million made every week across its platform — although not all are successfully fulfilled.

Appear Here charges a 15% booking fee, meaning that if even a small fraction of that $110 million figure is actually being booked, it is likely making tens of millions a year in revenue.

The future looks rosy for Appear Here but Bailey is keen to maintain the company culture as it grows. All employees use the same company issued notebooks and pens — a small touch, but one that's clearly important to Bailey — and all 70 staff still have lunch together on Fridays.

"You have to build a company that you're going to love and attract people with the same values," Bailey says.

Where did he learn that? During our interview, he mentions lunches with Net-A-Porter founder Massenet and hanging out with Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky in San Francisco ("He loved our brand").

Ross Bailey, Appear HereNet-A-Porter and Airbnb are two of the three companies Bailey most admires. The other is Nike. He has just finished reading Shoe Dog, the memoir of Nike founder Phil Knight, and implores me to read it.

"Nike defined an industry," Bailey says. Before Nike, "if you weren't running track, you didn't buy trainers. We want to be the Nike for entrepreneurs and creatives."

Around 40% of pop-ups on Appear Here are food and drinks stalls, while the rest are fashion, consumer goods, or other retailers like florists. Around 125,000 people have registered on the platform to rent space.

"I love the idea that we can help everyone bring their ideas to life," Bailey says.

Tokyo, Manchester, and even Toulouse come up when we talk about cities that could be interesting to Appear Here — but Bailey won't be drawn on specifics.

"We've got to be where the best ideas are," he says simply.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A crypto expert explains the difference between the two largest cryptocurrencies in the world: bitcoin and Ethereum

A Gates Foundation-backed startup wants to make daily pills a thing of the past

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

pill medicine man taking

  • Eventually, we might be able to consider daily pills a thing of the past.
  • That's the vision of Lyndra, a company developing technology that transforms daily pills into weekly treatments.
  • The hope is by taking a pill only once a week, you're less likely to forget a dose, something that's critical when treating conditions like HIV. 


One day, a daily prescription will feel as outdated as not having an answering machine.

That's the vision of Amy Schulman, CEO of the startup Lyndra. Lyndra's developing pills that can be taken on a weekly basis instead of once a day. 

"I imagine a world where my children's children will say to me, 'I don't understand — you took a pill every day?' And it will be as inconceivable to them that I took a pill every day as it is to my children that I had to argue with their grandparents over getting an answering machine," Schulman said. 

An estimated $100 billion of avoidable medical costs are attributed to people not taking their medications as prescribed. And for many daily treatments, skipping a pill can be a major issue that leads to the drug not being as effective in the long run or even developing resistance to the medications in the case of HIV. 

Amy Schulman High ResLyndra was founded in 2015 after the Gates Foundation provided a grant to Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Bob Langer to develop a long-acting malaria prevention treatment. In 2017, the company raised $23 million in funding to get into human clinical trials.

While the pill technology could be used for any number of daily medications, to start Lyndra's focusing in on a few areas. Those include neurologic conditions like Alzheimer's disease in partnership with Allergan, behavioral conditions, and one day potentially developing longer-acting treatments for diabetes or cardiovascular disease. 

And in January, the company showed that in animals it could deliver commonly-used HIV medication on a weekly basis, rather than needing to take it every day.

How a starfish-shaped pill could change the way we take medication

The weeklong pill might look like any other vitamin or pill you take that comes in a capsule. What's different is what's inside.

Once the pill hits the stomach, the capsul dissolves and the pill opens up with six biodegradable arms that fold out in the shape of a starfish and emit the drug. 

"Like most great solutions, once you figure it out it's really simple," Schulman said. 

Lyndra isn't the only company trying to figure out how to make people more adherent to their medications. That includes coming out with injectable versions that only require you to take it once or twice a month, and implanted devices. But those pose their own challenges, since they can be more invasive or require more medical attention than a simple prescription. 

Especially when it comes to treating HIV, access to a clinic where you might be able to get an injection could be limited, Schulman said. 

"People would by and large prefer to take a pill," Schulman said. 

SEE ALSO: 'We're treated like drug addicts': As America fights opioid addiction, the healthcare system is failing people who live with chronic pain

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NOW WATCH: A crypto expert explains the difference between the two largest cryptocurrencies in the world: bitcoin and Ethereum

Pineapple Fund’s $5 Million Bitcoin Donation Boosts Medicine Foundation

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

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Cryptocurrency philanthropy is spreading. The Pineapple Fund, whose founders remain anonymous, has given $5 million worth of bitcoin to the Agoura Hills, Calif.-based Open Medicine Foundation (OMF) over two separate donations. The funds, which were deposited into the nonprofit’s BitPay account and which are reportedly being converted to US dollars, are being directed toward “accelerating much-needed

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JPMorgan, Bank of America Say No to Crypto Transactions on Credit Cards

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The post JPMorgan, Bank of America Say No to Crypto Transactions on Credit Cards appeared first on CCN

The top two US banks took what little wind was left in investors’ sales today. JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America have both placed a ban on cryptocurrency transactions via credit cards, according to Bloomberg reports. The bitcoin price is holding at about a 5.75% decline, trading at $8,589 in what is shaping up to

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