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Bitcoin Or Bust: Taking British Banking Out Of Exchanges

Forbes, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

With a host of bitcoin exchanges in the UK having gone out of business from pressure exerted by commercial banks - through denying or withdrawing facilities - and despite the British government’s 'pro-blockchain' stance, this article examines the need for a fundamental rethink in approach.

Why High Transaction Fees Aren’t a Big Issue for Bitcoin

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

[…]

The post Why High Transaction Fees Aren’t a Big Issue for Bitcoin appeared first on CryptoCoinsNews.

Are Bitcoin Traders Planning for an ETF Approval?

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Are traders pricing in the SEC's upcoming decision on the Winklevoss ETF? We asked experts from across the industry.

Source

A director at the world's biggest investor breaks down why investors are pouring into one of the riskiest markets

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

jim keenanJim Keenan manages over $160 billion in fixed-income assets for the world's biggest investor. 

As head of BlackRock’s global credit platform, Keenan oversees the flagship BlackRock High Yield Bond Fund. 

In our recent interview with Keenan, he said a "regime shift" in the economy is encouraging investors to take on more risk. But that's only likely to become a problem in the next two years or so.

This interview was edited for length and clarity. 

Akin Oyedele: There has recently been a surge of inflows into high-yield debt. What do you think is behind this?

Jim Keenan: If you take a step back and think about all the asset classes, where they are priced today, and the economic backdrop, credit is not exciting.

But the backdrop still seems okay. The reasons include we continue to have economic tailwinds. Remember that in 2015, we had an earnings recession where you had the commodity sell-off that flowed into other sectors. You had a pretty big pullback in risk assets and certainly in the credit markets that slowed down a lot of the emerging-market countries. And then mid-2016, you started to see that recover.

That in it's very nature started to create almost like a mini-cycle where you started to see some more positive upside. Fuel got put on the fire with the election at the end of the year. Not that it's been approved or enacted, but you have a government in which the rhetoric behind their policy is one that is pro-US growth and pro-reflation. Even though prices for credit assets might not be that exciting from an absolute return perspective, this environment will tend to be something that produces decent relative returns.

A lot of the high yield and bank-loan assets are still going to be subject to volatility. But if you look over the next 12-18 months, if this policy comes through, you're at a period of time where fixed-income assets and more rate-sensitive assets could be exposed to inflation picking up further, and being very subject to interpretations of both fiscal policy and monetary response to that policy. Your outcome for rate assets could be dramatic with regard to the shape of the curve and the level of inflation.

It's harder to invest in an environment where you still have a very low absolute yield across global fixed income assets or rate assets. You're also at a point in time where there's a lot volatility associated with the timing and success of fiscal policy, which could lead to more volatile drawdowns in the equity market. So you get more upside convexity if all this comes through, but certainly people are starting to question that.

High yield and bank loans tend be tied towards the health of corporate profits. US high yield is tied towards the local companies which benefit from a lot of these policies. Maybe you're going to make a 4-5% return profile off that. In today's world, if you can do that with a higher degree of confidence because of the current economic and policy environment, that's what's leading to people taking money off the shelf and put it in. It's not because there's a high expectation that you're going to see spreads rally. It just becomes attractive viz-a-viz that backdrop. 

Oyedele: So based on this macro backdrop, do you think that the premium of high-yield above Treasurys is fairly valued?

Keenan: It's not without risk. I think it's fair right now, but it's full.

What I mean is I think in this backdrop, if successful, the sentiment alone in the market is going to continue to lead — probably over at least the next couple of quarters — a positive momentum with regards to corporate investment and consumption. In all likelihood, there's a pickup from the last couple of years when you were in more volatile times. That generally is a positive economic environment. And I think the Fed will increase rates, but it's still going to be slow because they're still looking at incoming fiscal stimulus and where inflation is going.

High yield, I think, is fair to the level of risk in the economy right now, if you look at it over the next 12 months. If you look at periods of time when there was a positive economic backdrop, spreads can be low for a long time.

Looking at the underlying risks of credit, this is nowhere near the excessive lending and risk profiles and leveraged-buyout activities that went on pre-financial crisis. A lot of rules over the last few years have led to corporate activity that has been far more conservative. Balances sheets are in pretty good places. Certainly, there's a little bit more excessive risk getting put on, but it's not like there's big-time leverage like you saw in 2006/2007. 

Oyedele: The president is working to scale back some of those regulations put in place after the financial crisis. What's the possible impact of this, keeping in mind of course that it's still very early days?

Keenan: It's hard to look at what it's going to look like over the next two to four years.

Post-crisis, investors, corporate managers, and certainly the banking system were far more conservative either because they had to be, or because they were more worried about deflation or the potential risk to the downside. You had a long period of time where it was about balance sheet cleansing and healing, and you had fiscal gridlock and excessive monetary policy. Those had limitations and you didn't necessarily see the flow through down into the real economy.

This is a regime shift. You are shifting from a fiscal gridlock and monetary stimulus to monetary data dependency and fiscal stimulus. So there is a shift here to try to drive economic activity directly into the real economy. How that plays out remains to be seen over the long term. But in the short term, it's certainly a bit more positive. 

In past environments when you had very strong economic growth, you generally had investors that tried to create excess returns that stretched into areas which are fine in a growing environment. But if there start to be shifts, that's when you start to see people taking on too much risk relative to the level of returns. I don't see that as a problem right now in 2017. In 2018 or 2019, there's certainly a level of cyclicality that's brought back into the market because these policies are stimulating above-trend growth. And the higher or the longer you drive this, in all likelihood, that shapes when you start to see that correction come in.

Oyedele: What sectors do you like and dislike right now?

Keenan: We're probably a little bit more conservative in the short-term and dialing back risk because since November, you've had a pretty big run up in risk.

That being said, over the next six months, there's a positive backdrop. But I think you're going to see more volatility spikes, and normalization of some of the corrections that the markets have seen historically. Longer term, I still think that if you do see that correction, it will be a good time to buy in because we still like the fundamental backdrop for earnings and therefore equities and high yield.

We're at a point where we would continue to see steepening of the yield curve and inflation in not necessarily the short term but over the next 12 months as you start to see any of these [Trump] policies get enacted. In that case, things like financials, even though they've rallied significantly, have a pretty decent backdrop.

There's a tailwind behind some of the commodity trades that have gone up. You have to be selective and careful because things have rallied so much. The ancillary part to that is, as you have a more stable oil price and you have a positive economic environment, some of the things around commodities and the derivatives of commodities that took pretty big hits in 2015 have rallied, but there are still ways you can create alpha in that space.

I'd be more cautious of some of the other areas that are far more exposed to secular shifts in the credit markets. Things like retail, brick and mortar stores — the high level of inventories relative to the trend, and Amazon and other online distribution — those are hard businesses to have leverage on right now.

SEE ALSO: A former hedge fund manager who retired at 36 is sounding the alarm on the Trump trade

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here's how to use one of the many apps to buy and trade bitcoin

A director at the world's biggest investor breaks down why investors are pouring into one of the riskiest markets

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

jim keenanJim Keenan manages over $160 billion in fixed-income assets for the world's biggest investor. 

As head of BlackRock’s global credit platform, Keenan oversees the flagship BlackRock High Yield Bond Fund. 

In our recent interview with Keenan, he said a "regime shift" in the economy is encouraging investors to take on more risk. But that's only likely to become a problem in the next two years or so.

This interview was edited for length and clarity. 

Akin Oyedele: There has recently been a surge of inflows into high-yield debt. What do you think is behind this?

Jim Keenan: If you take a step back and think about all the asset classes, where they are priced today, and the economic backdrop, credit is not exciting.

But the backdrop still seems okay. The reasons include we continue to have economic tailwinds. Remember that in 2015, we had an earnings recession where you had the commodity sell-off that flowed into other sectors. You had a pretty big pullback in risk assets and certainly in the credit markets that slowed down a lot of the emerging-market countries. And then mid-2016, you started to see that recover.

That in it's very nature started to create almost like a mini-cycle where you started to see some more positive upside. Fuel got put on the fire with the election at the end of the year. Not that it's been approved or enacted, but you have a government in which the rhetoric behind their policy is one that is pro-US growth and pro-reflation. Even though prices for credit assets might not be that exciting from an absolute return perspective, this environment will tend to be something that produces decent relative returns.

A lot of the high yield and bank-loan assets are still going to be subject to volatility. But if you look over the next 12-18 months, if this policy comes through, you're at a period of time where fixed-income assets and more rate-sensitive assets could be exposed to inflation picking up further, and being very subject to interpretations of both fiscal policy and monetary response to that policy. Your outcome for rate assets could be dramatic with regard to the shape of the curve and the level of inflation.

It's harder to invest in an environment where you still have a very low absolute yield across global fixed income assets or rate assets. You're also at a point in time where there's a lot volatility associated with the timing and success of fiscal policy, which could lead to more volatile drawdowns in the equity market. So you get more upside convexity if all this comes through, but certainly people are starting to question that.

High yield and bank loans tend be tied towards the health of corporate profits. US high yield is tied towards the local companies which benefit from a lot of these policies. Maybe you're going to make a 4-5% return profile off that. In today's world, if you can do that with a higher degree of confidence because of the current economic and policy environment, that's what's leading to people taking money off the shelf and put it in. It's not because there's a high expectation that you're going to see spreads rally. It just becomes attractive viz-a-viz that backdrop. 

Oyedele: So based on this macro backdrop, do you think that the premium of high-yield above Treasurys is fairly valued?

Keenan: It's not without risk. I think it's fair right now, but it's full.

What I mean is I think in this backdrop, if successful, the sentiment alone in the market is going to continue to lead — probably over at least the next couple of quarters — a positive momentum with regards to corporate investment and consumption. In all likelihood, there's a pickup from the last couple of years when you were in more volatile times. That generally is a positive economic environment. And I think the Fed will increase rates, but it's still going to be slow because they're still looking at incoming fiscal stimulus and where inflation is going.

High yield, I think, is fair to the level of risk in the economy right now, if you look at it over the next 12 months. If you look at periods of time when there was a positive economic backdrop, spreads can be low for a long time.

Looking at the underlying risks of credit, this is nowhere near the excessive lending and risk profiles and leveraged-buyout activities that went on pre-financial crisis. A lot of rules over the last few years have led to corporate activity that has been far more conservative. Balances sheets are in pretty good places. Certainly, there's a little bit more excessive risk getting put on, but it's not like there's big-time leverage like you saw in 2006/2007. 

Oyedele: The president is working to scale back some of those regulations put in place after the financial crisis. What's the possible impact of this, keeping in mind of course that it's still very early days?

Keenan: It's hard to look at what it's going to look like over the next two to four years.

Post-crisis, investors, corporate managers, and certainly the banking system were far more conservative either because they had to be, or because they were more worried about deflation or the potential risk to the downside. You had a long period of time where it was about balance sheet cleansing and healing, and you had fiscal gridlock and excessive monetary policy. Those had limitations and you didn't necessarily see the flow through down into the real economy.

This is a regime shift. You are shifting from a fiscal gridlock and monetary stimulus to monetary data dependency and fiscal stimulus. So there is a shift here to try to drive economic activity directly into the real economy. How that plays out remains to be seen over the long term. But in the short term, it's certainly a bit more positive. 

In past environments when you had very strong economic growth, you generally had investors that tried to create excess returns that stretched into areas which are fine in a growing environment. But if there start to be shifts, that's when you start to see people taking on too much risk relative to the level of returns. I don't see that as a problem right now in 2017. In 2018 or 2019, there's certainly a level of cyclicality that's brought back into the market because these policies are stimulating above-trend growth. And the higher or the longer you drive this, in all likelihood, that shapes when you start to see that correction come in.

Oyedele: What sectors do you like and dislike right now?

Keenan: We're probably a little bit more conservative in the short-term and dialing back risk because since November, you've had a pretty big run up in risk.

That being said, over the next six months, there's a positive backdrop. But I think you're going to see more volatility spikes, and normalization of some of the corrections that the markets have seen historically. Longer term, I still think that if you do see that correction, it will be a good time to buy in because we still like the fundamental backdrop for earnings and therefore equities and high yield.

We're at a point where we would continue to see steepening of the yield curve and inflation in not necessarily the short term but over the next 12 months as you start to see any of these [Trump] policies get enacted. In that case, things like financials, even though they've rallied significantly, have a pretty decent backdrop.

There's a tailwind behind some of the commodity trades that have gone up. You have to be selective and careful because things have rallied so much. The ancillary part to that is, as you have a more stable oil price and you have a positive economic environment, some of the things around commodities and the derivatives of commodities that took pretty big hits in 2015 have rallied, but there are still ways you can create alpha in that space.

I'd be more cautious of some of the other areas that are far more exposed to secular shifts in the credit markets. Things like retail, brick and mortar stores — the high level of inventories relative to the trend, and Amazon and other online distribution — those are hard businesses to have leverage on right now.

SEE ALSO: A former hedge fund manager who retired at 36 is sounding the alarm on the Trump trade

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here's how to use one of the many apps to buy and trade bitcoin

Markets are starting to get nervous about Trump

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

donald trump

In the weeks immediately following the election of President Donald Trump a few common themes seem to strike the market.

The so-called Trump trade that saw stocks rips upwards, bonds tumble and inflation expectations take off as the possibility of policies such as deregulation, fiscal stimulus, and tax cuts enticed investors.

It seems, however, that three weeks into the Trump presidency the trade is starting to wear off.

Treading water

The enthusiasm in markets following the election of Trump (which it should be noted was the opposite reaction of consensus) has seemed to wane since the inauguration as investors digest the president's policies.

Stocks have cooled off on a relative basis in recent days. From the election on November 8 to Inauguration Day the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial average jumped by 6.2% and 8.2% respectively. Since the inauguration, the indexes have moved up just 2.0% for the S&P and 2.3% for the Dow.

Even some of the biggest potential winners from Trump's policies have cooled off. Goldman Sachs rallied by 27.6% between the election and the inauguration, and since then it has gone up by only 4.9%.

Bonds also have managed to slow down their selling that started following the election. The US Treasury 10-year note yield was 1.8547% on November 8 and lept to 2.4468% by January 20 (remember: as bond prices go down, yields increase). Three weeks later and the 10-year yield has actually dipped slightly to 2.4055% on Friday.

The currency markets have also cooled off on the Trump trade as well. The Mexican peso, which had collapsed against the US dollar following Trump's election, has actually strengthened since the inauguration. The dollar, which was surging, has also lost some of its gains against the world's major currencies.

As noted by Bloomberg's Luke Kawa and Brian Chappatta, even inflation expectations — which had been the one continuous part of the Trump trade — have begun to cool off as investors question whether or not the fiscal stimulus Trump promised is going to come through.

While the timeframe is shorter between inauguration day and now, many of these moves plateaued in mid-December after the initial rally under Trump. For instance, Goldman Sachs has only moved 2.2% since December 30, two weeks before the inauguration, and the 10-year yield on that day was 2.444%.

Policy preferences

It appears that much of the slowdown, according to some of the world's biggest investors, is due to the policies that Trump has implemented since he got into the Oval Office.

Following the election, it was clear what Wall Street and investors wanted most out of Trump: tax cuts and deregulation.

In fact, according to FactSet data, during fourth quarter earnings calls, 85 of the 317 S&P 500 companies that have reported so far mentioned tax policy under Trump, the most of any of his proposals. Regulation came in second with 63 companies mentioning it.

While Wall Street was hoping for a lighter tax bill and regulatory reform, Trump has instead signed executive orders focusing on immigration and trade barriers, both of which most economists have said will be economic drags.

Larry Fink, the CEO of the world's largest asset manager BlackRock, said that there are "dark shadows" hanging over the markets, partly due to the recent moves by the Trump. Fink also said that the markets look "bi-polar" and he wouldn't be surprised if there were "setbacks" for stocks.

Hedge fund giants and large institutional investors have also begun to shift their thoughts on Trump, worrying about his protectionist and anti-immigration stances instead of cheering the possibility of tax and regulatory changes.

Ray Dalio, head of the world's biggest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, initially was enthusiastic about the pro-business policies under Trump but after just a few weeks of Trump, he said in a letter to clients his opinion had shifted.

"Nationalism, protectionism and militarism increase global tensions and the risks of conflict," Dalio's letter said. "For these reasons, while we remain open-minded, we are increasingly concerned about the emerging policies of the Trump administration."

While all of Trump's policies were part of his platform when he was a candidate, the order in which he is addressing these promises and the fact that he is following through is apparently surprising to many investors.

The next move

It does, however, appear that Trump may shift his focus to the changes that businesses and investors wanted to see in the first place.

Trump said during a meeting with airline CEOs that he expects to have a plan to slash corporate and individual taxes in two to three weeks. He also signed executive orders directing the Treasury and Labor departments to re-examine and possibly roll back the Dodd-Frank banking regulations and the fiduciary standard for financial advisors, respectively.

In order for a resumption of the post-election Trump trade, there will likely have to be a shift in focus toward the policies business are excited about. If instead, Trump focuses on immigration bans, border taxes, crowd sizes, and inaccuracies regarding voter fraud influence on the popular vote, the Trump bump may be over.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here's how to use one of the many apps to buy and trade bitcoin

Musician & Bitcoin Enthusiast Tatiana Moroz Reintroduces Tatianacoin

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

[…]

The post Musician & Bitcoin Enthusiast Tatiana Moroz Reintroduces Tatianacoin appeared first on CryptoCoinsNews.

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