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The boss of Level39 is leaving to look at the most exciting area of fintech — blockchain

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Eric Van Der Kleij

Eric van der Kleij is stepping down as head of London fintech hub Level39 after nearly 3 years in the job.

Level39 was set up by Canary Wharf Group to encourage financial technology, or fintech, startups to base themselves in Canary Wharf, offering companies support, services, and office space that could accommodate as little as 1 or 2 people.

Van der Kleij helped grow Level39 to one of the biggest fintech hubs in Europe. In an emailed statement to Business Insider, van der Kleij said: "I am so incredibly proud of what the team has achieved in the last three years."

Level39 said in a statement on its website that van der Kleij has "exceeded expectations in activating and transforming Canary Wharf into a preeminent destination for high growth tech companies."

Van der Kleij, who was the founding chair of TechCityUK, is leaving to focus on ENTIQ, an innovation consultancy that he runs. The company looking at blockchain technology, the software that underpins bitcoin.

Van der Kleij said in an email: "ENTIQ is the specialist innovation practise I founded with Claire Cockerton (founding CEO of Innovate Finance) and that is growing fast, delivering innovation programmes for major corporates as well as advising on ecosystem creation like Level39. 

"As a company we invested in our own 'ENTIQ Lab' — a technology lab based on Level39's High Growth Space:24, and upskilled the team on the rapidly emerging field of distributed ledger, or blockchain.

"As my understanding of the true capability of the technology has grown, coupled with the strong interest from the industry I realised there has never been a better time to do a deep dive into this area, hence the move to seek a successor."

Banks are extremely interested in harnessing blockchain technology and van der Kleij told Business Insider earlier this year: "The real powerful work being done in fintech is blockchain. I can tell you now with certainty that every major western bank we’ve spoken to, and some eastern ones, are looking at blockchain technology."

You can read Business Insider's full interview with Eric van der Kleij from earlier in the year here.

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Quiz: This Week's Bitcoin News

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Are you up to date with the latest bitcoin and blockchain news? Test your knowledge with our quiz for the week of 28th September – 4th October.

The Blockchain Magic: Φ Free Anonymous Internet

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

A group of developers has tapped the key advantages of the block chain – anonymity and decentralized information – and married them with the expansive content sharing power of the Internet to offer a Free Anonymous Internet (FAI). To signify the uniqueness of this FAI system, the developers have designated it as “Φ.” Block chain technology makes the self-supporting of a peer-to-peer (P2P) system possible with interaction, storage, communication, accounting and currency. These are the foundations of the Internet that are running nowadays in a centralized way. Block chain technology may become the basis of a second generation Internet that […]

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Bitcoin Price Reattempting $250

CryptoCoins News, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Bitcoin price is pushing higher in a typical impulse wave pattern. The $240 and 1550 CNY level is offering “resistance” due to nervous profit taking near the previous local high. A trade entry suggestion. This analysis is provided by xbt.social with a 3 hour delay. Read the full analysis here. Not a member? Join now and receive a $29 discount using the code CCN29. Bitcoin Price Analysis Time of analysis: 15h26 UTC OKCoin 3Mth Futures 15-Minute Chart From the analysis pages of xbt.social, earlier today: Our initial target has been hit squarely, and intermittent Fib extension levels imply an eventual […]

The post Bitcoin Price Reattempting $250 appeared first on CCN: Financial Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency News.

The boss of this global payments company says it would worth a lot more if it wasn't listed

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Hank Uberoi, Earthport CEO.

Hank Uberoi, Goldman Sachs' former technology chief, says Earthport is "probably the single largest investment opportunity I’ve seen in my lifetime, and I’ve been investing for 28 years."

As Earthport's boss, Uberoi is obviously biased. But he seriously believes the company can revolutionise the way international business payments are made.

"If you think about manufacturing, go back 30, 40 years, if you wanted to buy materials in one country, manufacture in a second country, then sell in a third country, you really had to be very large," Uberoi tells Business Insider.

"You needed your own ships, your own aircrafts. Fast forward to today and with FedEx and UPS, nobody would dream of moving that stuff around themselves. These guys are deep experts in a highly complex and highly regulated field. They will always be better at this than any company, no matter how large."

'Try calling Citibank saying can you send this message to India'

A similar transition hasn't yet happened in the world of finance. Banks still try and do it all when it comes to moving money around the world.

When they can't, they partner with companies or banks that can. But these partners take a cut and communication can be an issue, meaning the process is expensive and convoluted.

"You’ve got this hodgepodge of banks around the world and they’ve got relationships with each other," Uberoi says. "I’m a bank in the UK, I’ve got a relationship with a bank in Malaysia, I send instructions to them. 30 years ago when there were 7 countries that mattered and there were a few thousand companies and a few million payments a year, that worked fine."

But in a world of globalised trade, that model is out of date, Uberoi says. "Cross border payments are expensive, they’re error prone, the money you send is not what arrives, and that’s creating a real issue."

Cross border payments are expensive, they’re error prone, the money you send is not what arrives

He should know — he spent 15 years at Goldman Sachs, rising to head the bank's technology division, before moving to hedge fund giant Citadel.

Uberoi has his own horror story of moving money: "I do a lot of business in India. I gave the Reserve Bank of India a code they asked for but they said 'No, it’s got to come from the bank you sent the payment with via Swift [a messaging system used by banks] in this particular format'.

"Try calling somebody in Citibank saying can you send this message to India. It literally took me 2 and a half months. If you don’t resolve it they’ll blacklist your account. It’s a convoluted, anarchic infrastructure, and that’s just one country."

'We go into banks and we know more than they do'

For banks, international payments are just one of a number of things they do and fixing inefficiencies in the system is not high on their agendas.

Earthport is about "being very deep and very narrow in a very complex, highly regulated market," says Uberoi. "We are essentially creating the FedEx, UPS, and DHL of payments."

Rather than simply trust partners to get on with it, Earthport sends payments to its own hubs within each country who make sure payments are properly formatted, reducing the chance of error. It then uses the local payment networks — the "rails" — within each country to process the payments.

FedEx trucks are seen parked in New York March 18, 2010. Package delivery giant FedEx Corp raised its outlook and posted sharply higher profit, but its shares fell as its domestic volume numbers disappointed investors' hopes for a U.S. economic recovery.Uberoi explains: "We move money around in bulk and then we create files that are pre-validated and pre-formatted for the local clearing and we deliver to our partner banks in the local country, with the view that they shouldn’t touch it. The whole idea is to eliminate any chance of errors creeping into the system from manual processes."

Earthport's strength lies in blending a smart technology platform with human expertise of local payment infrastructures.

Uberoi says: "Because we do one thing and one thing only, we’ve got people talking to 64 countries everyday. Whenever anything changes we know instantly. This is not a static database, it’s changing every hour."

"We can go into any one of the banks and pretty quickly it becomes clear that we know more about payments than they do. Not because they’re not smart, but because that function is fragmented across so many different countries and departments that there’s no one person who actually sees it end to end."

'My goal was to do this for 6 months on a part-time basis'

Uberoi ended up running Earthport almost by accident. He invested in the company, which is listed in London, back in 2009. But in 2010 he ended up playing a part in ousting the then CEO over troubles with the companies finances.

"I put some money in and my goal was to do this for 6 months on a part-time basis and then grow it from there," Uberoi recalls.

"About 3 years ago it became obvious that this is probably the single largest investment opportunity I’ve seen in my lifetime, and I’ve been investing for 28 years. That's why I’m doing this full time — I don’t get paid for this."

The market for cross border business-to-business payments globally is $28 trillion (£18.4 trillion) a year, compared to $685 billion (£451 billion) a year for the remittance market, where individuals send money across borders.

And while the market for international payments for consumers is hugely crowded — TransferWise, Azimo, WorldRemit, and Western Union to name just a few — almost no one is trying to tackle business to business payments.

"The size of the opportunity is such that if we got 5% of the market, we’d be the largest payment company in the world," Uberoi says.

'If we were private we would be raising at a very different valuation'

Because the opportunity for growth is so big, Earthport is investing aggressively in growth. Part of that involves pricing its services competitively.

Uberoi says: "Our solution is faster, cheaper, more efficient, and we could have said it’s a so much better solution we’ll charge you $50 (£33) more than you’re paying now. Instead we’ve said, it costs you $100 (£66) a payment? We’ll charge you low single digit dollars. We basically decided we’re not in this for the short run."

The knock-on effect of this, though, is profit and revenues are not as big as investors would like. Earthport's full-year results on Tuesday showed a 78% rise in revenue to £19.27 million ($29.2 million) but losses widened from £6.33 million to £8.71 million ($9.6 million). Shares fell by more than 1.5% on the day.earthport"There’s very much a timetable for profit," Uberoi says. "We had predicted that we would break even on a six-month run rate basis in the last half, which we did. But at that point we realised that the opportunity has become so large that it would be silly to think about breakeven rather than invest in growing."

Earthport is listed on AIM, the stock market for growing companies in London, and has a market value of just £192 million ($291 million) — trifling compared to the huge private financial technology companies currently springing up.

It's a point not lost on Uberoi: "We’re listed for historical reasons, if we were private today, if you look at what’s happening in the private equity world, we would be raising money at a very different valuation. It would be measured not on where we are today, not on our revenue growth or how we’re doing now, it would be based on the size of the market opportunity, what are the barriers to entry.

"Take a company like Uber, they don’t make money, they’re not going to make money for 10 years. But look at the size of the market."

The logo of car-sharing service app Uber on a smartphone over a reserved lane for taxis in a street is seen in this photo illustration taken in Madrid on December 10, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Perez/FilesUberoi isn't planning to take the business private though.

He says: "A couple of years ago [going private] crossed our minds, because the market really didn’t understand. They still don’t really understand but what happened is we realised our clients really like the fact that we’re listed.

"What we’re doing is a mission critical function. If they’re going to move it to us, they need to be really confident that we’ll do it well, that we’ll be around, and that a competitor is not going to buy us. The fact that we’re public means everything is disclosed."

Huge banks like HSBC, Standard Chartered, Santander, and Bank of America now trust Earthport to move money around the world for them, as well as organisations like the United Nations and even Western Union. The company is on track to process $10 billion (£6.4 billion) worth of transactions by the end of the year.

'We’ll solve the problem in the way that works'

Uberoi's focus now is on expanding the business. Earthport is in talks to enter Nigeria among other countries and it is also adding to its product offering.

The company recently signed a deal to offer payments through Ripple, the Silicon Valley payment system developed using the blockchain, the software that underpins bitcoin.

"We started seeing people are interested in new technologies — bitcoin, blockchain, distributed ledger technology," Uberoi says. "We said, we don’t know if this is the right way for moving money around but banks are interested in exploring it, so we’ll explore it." 

As a hub, Earthport on-boards its clients only once before letting them use any of the payment methods they want. It also meets anti-money laundering requirements, meaning banks can use the efficiency of Ripple's distributed ledger technology with minimal hassle.

"We’re going to become the utility and hub for the industry that finds the fastest and most efficient way of doing something at any point in time. We don’t play favourites, we’ll solve the problem in the way that works for our clients."

Join the conversation about this story »

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The boss of this global payments company says it would worth a lot more if it wasn't listed

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Hank Uberoi, Earthport CEO.

Hank Uberoi, Goldman Sachs' former technology chief, says Earthport is "probably the single largest investment opportunity I’ve seen in my lifetime, and I’ve been investing for 28 years."

As Earthport's boss, Uberoi is obviously biased. But he seriously believes the company can revolutionise the way international business payments are made.

"If you think about manufacturing, go back 30, 40 years, if you wanted to buy materials in one country, manufacture in a second country, then sell in a third country, you really had to be very large," Uberoi tells Business Insider.

"You needed your own ships, your own aircrafts. Fast forward to today and with FedEx and UPS, nobody would dream of moving that stuff around themselves. These guys are deep experts in a highly complex and highly regulated field. They will always be better at this than any company, no matter how large."

'Try calling Citibank saying can you send this message to India'

A similar transition hasn't yet happened in the world of finance. Banks still try and do it all when it comes to moving money around the world.

When they can't, they partner with companies or banks that can. But these partners take a cut and communication can be an issue, meaning the process is expensive and convoluted.

"You’ve got this hodgepodge of banks around the world and they’ve got relationships with each other," Uberoi says. "I’m a bank in the UK, I’ve got a relationship with a bank in Malaysia, I send instructions to them. 30 years ago when there were 7 countries that mattered and there were a few thousand companies and a few million payments a year, that worked fine."

But in a world of globalised trade, that model is out of date, Uberoi says. "Cross border payments are expensive, they’re error prone, the money you send is not what arrives, and that’s creating a real issue."

Cross border payments are expensive, they’re error prone, the money you send is not what arrives

He should know — he spent 15 years at Goldman Sachs, rising to head the bank's technology division, before moving to hedge fund giant Citadel.

Uberoi has his own horror story of moving money: "I do a lot of business in India. I gave the Reserve Bank of India a code they asked for but they said 'No, it’s got to come from the bank you sent the payment with via Swift [a messaging system used by banks] in this particular format'.

"Try calling somebody in Citibank saying can you send this message to India. It literally took me 2 and a half months. If you don’t resolve it they’ll blacklist your account. It’s a convoluted, anarchic infrastructure, and that’s just one country."

'We go into banks and we know more than they do'

For banks, international payments are just one of a number of things they do and fixing inefficiencies in the system is not high on their agendas.

Earthport is about "being very deep and very narrow in a very complex, highly regulated market," says Uberoi. "We are essentially creating the FedEx, UPS, and DHL of payments."

Rather than simply trust partners to get on with it, Earthport sends payments to its own hubs within each country who make sure payments are properly formatted, reducing the chance of error. It then uses the local payment networks — the "rails" — within each country to process the payments.

FedEx trucks are seen parked in New York March 18, 2010. Package delivery giant FedEx Corp raised its outlook and posted sharply higher profit, but its shares fell as its domestic volume numbers disappointed investors' hopes for a U.S. economic recovery.Uberoi explains: "We move money around in bulk and then we create files that are pre-validated and pre-formatted for the local clearing and we deliver to our partner banks in the local country, with the view that they shouldn’t touch it. The whole idea is to eliminate any chance of errors creeping into the system from manual processes."

Earthport's strength lies in blending a smart technology platform with human expertise of local payment infrastructures.

Uberoi says: "Because we do one thing and one thing only, we’ve got people talking to 64 countries everyday. Whenever anything changes we know instantly. This is not a static database, it’s changing every hour."

"We can go into any one of the banks and pretty quickly it becomes clear that we know more about payments than they do. Not because they’re not smart, but because that function is fragmented across so many different countries and departments that there’s no one person who actually sees it end to end."

'My goal was to do this for 6 months on a part-time basis'

Uberoi ended up running Earthport almost by accident. He invested in the company, which is listed in London, back in 2009. But in 2010 he ended up playing a part in ousting the then CEO over troubles with the companies finances.

"I put some money in and my goal was to do this for 6 months on a part-time basis and then grow it from there," Uberoi recalls.

"About 3 years ago it became obvious that this is probably the single largest investment opportunity I’ve seen in my lifetime, and I’ve been investing for 28 years. That's why I’m doing this full time — I don’t get paid for this."

The market for cross border business-to-business payments globally is $28 trillion (£18.4 trillion) a year, compared to $685 billion (£451 billion) a year for the remittance market, where individuals send money across borders.

And while the market for international payments for consumers is hugely crowded — TransferWise, Azimo, WorldRemit, and Western Union to name just a few — almost no one is trying to tackle business to business payments.

"The size of the opportunity is such that if we got 5% of the market, we’d be the largest payment company in the world," Uberoi says.

'If we were private we would be raising at a very different valuation'

Because the opportunity for growth is so big, Earthport is investing aggressively in growth. Part of that involves pricing its services competitively.

Uberoi says: "Our solution is faster, cheaper, more efficient, and we could have said it’s a so much better solution we’ll charge you $50 (£33) more than you’re paying now. Instead we’ve said, it costs you $100 (£66) a payment? We’ll charge you low single digit dollars. We basically decided we’re not in this for the short run."

The knock-on effect of this, though, is profit and revenues are not as big as investors would like. Earthport's full-year results on Tuesday showed a 78% rise in revenue to £19.27 million ($29.2 million) but losses widened from £6.33 million to £8.71 million ($9.6 million). Shares fell by more than 1.5% on the day.earthport"There’s very much a timetable for profit," Uberoi says. "We had predicted that we would break even on a six-month run rate basis in the last half, which we did. But at that point we realised that the opportunity has become so large that it would be silly to think about breakeven rather than invest in growing."

Earthport is listed on AIM, the stock market for growing companies in London, and has a market value of just £192 million ($291 million) — trifling compared to the huge private financial technology companies currently springing up.

It's a point not lost on Uberoi: "We’re listed for historical reasons, if we were private today, if you look at what’s happening in the private equity world, we would be raising money at a very different valuation. It would be measured not on where we are today, not on our revenue growth or how we’re doing now, it would be based on the size of the market opportunity, what are the barriers to entry.

"Take a company like Uber, they don’t make money, they’re not going to make money for 10 years. But look at the size of the market."

The logo of car-sharing service app Uber on a smartphone over a reserved lane for taxis in a street is seen in this photo illustration taken in Madrid on December 10, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Perez/FilesUberoi isn't planning to take the business private though.

He says: "A couple of years ago [going private] crossed our minds, because the market really didn’t understand. They still don’t really understand but what happened is we realised our clients really like the fact that we’re listed.

"What we’re doing is a mission critical function. If they’re going to move it to us, they need to be really confident that we’ll do it well, that we’ll be around, and that a competitor is not going to buy us. The fact that we’re public means everything is disclosed."

Huge banks like HSBC, Standard Chartered, Santander, and Bank of America now trust Earthport to move money around the world for them, as well as organisations like the United Nations and even Western Union. The company is on track to process $10 billion (£6.4 billion) worth of transactions by the end of the year.

'We’ll solve the problem in the way that works'

Uberoi's focus now is on expanding the business. Earthport is in talks to enter Nigeria among other countries and it is also adding to its product offering.

The company recently signed a deal to offer payments through Ripple, the Silicon Valley payment system developed using the blockchain, the software that underpins bitcoin.

"We started seeing people are interested in new technologies — bitcoin, blockchain, distributed ledger technology," Uberoi says. "We said, we don’t know if this is the right way for moving money around but banks are interested in exploring it, so we’ll explore it." 

As a hub, Earthport on-boards its clients only once before letting them use any of the payment methods they want. It also meets anti-money laundering requirements, meaning banks can use the efficiency of Ripple's distributed ledger technology with minimal hassle.

"We’re going to become the utility and hub for the industry that finds the fastest and most efficient way of doing something at any point in time. We don’t play favourites, we’ll solve the problem in the way that works for our clients."

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This is what separates the Excel masters from the wannabes

Goldman Sachs put $50 million into bitcoin startup Circle and now it's coming to Europe

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Jeremy Allaire Circle CEO

Circle, the bitcoin services company backed by Goldman Sachs, is planning to open a London office from which it can spearhead European expansion, Business Insider can reveal.

Executives including founder and CEO Jeremy Allaire and co-founder Sean Neville are currently in London recruiting a country manager for the UK and scouting locations for an office here.

The company is also in talks with regulator the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) about getting an e-money licence, which would allow it to operate its digital wallet service in the UK and add sterling to the currencies it currently lets people hold.

Circle is one of the most high-profile bitcoin companies in the US, although in conversation Allaire distanced the business from bitcoin. Circle has raised $76 million (£50.17 million) since launch in 2013, most recently raising $50 million (£33.1 million) in a funding round led by Goldman Sachs back in April.

The company began by offering a digital bitcoin wallet that lets people hold, send, and receive bitcoin through online accounts. But Allaire says this was just a proof of concept.

His ambition for Circle is to use the technology that underpins bitcoin to make sending and receiving any form of money as easy as sending email.

Money is uploaded to your Circle account in whatever currency you wish, then when you want to pay someone it is converted into bitcoin and transferred via the blockchain to the receiver, who quickly converts the sum back to whatever currency they wish.

circle logo lightThe blockchain software, which underpins bitcoin, acts as the trusted middleman in the transaction — basically a proxy for a bank. The software records who has paid who and once it's set down it can't be changed.

Because of the speed of the transaction, both parties are unlikely to feel much impact from the volatility of bitcoin. And because they're not going through a bank, they won't pay foreign exchange or other fees. Circle's money transfer service is free.

Allaire hopes that Circle becomes the go-to app for payments, not just across borders, but small sums between friends — just as sending an email today is the same whether it's to Japan or Leeds.

Circle last week became the first US company to receive a BitLicense from New York regulators, a new license required for digital currency companies that want to operate in the state.

The new license means for the first time that Circle can let people hold, send, and receive US dollars on the app. Allaire and Neville are hoping this will lead to much wider adoption. Allaire said currently "hundreds of thousands" of people use Circle.

The company also hopes to soon offer the service in sterling and euros, followed by many other currencies. Circle, which is incorporated in Ireland but based largely in Boston, will use the London office as its base for European expansion once these currencies are added to the service.

Neville told Business Insider that Circle chose London for its European expansion base over Dublin largely because of the attitude of the government and regulators towards financial technology and digital currencies in the UK. Neville said Britain is amongst the most forward thinking in the world in this area.

Join the conversation about this story »

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