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AMD and NVIDIA go after Bitcoin miners with new video cards

Engadget, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Dedicated digital currency miners know the importance of good graphics cards -- modern GPUs have enough general-purpose computing power to process money formats like Bitcoin much faster than a CPU alone. They've never really been suited for non-stop...

Russia's Crypto-Winter Shows Signs of Thaw in Saint Petersburg

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

stpetersburg.jpg

A mixed crowd of denim jeans and custom-tailored suits, typical for crypto-events, is standing across the vertical aisle of the the main conference area at the Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference in Saint Petersburg, blocking the line of sight for those lucky enough to have snatched themselves a chair in the back. The hall, while spacious — high ceiling, tall arched windows partly covered with ASIC mining billboards — still isn’t quite large enough to fit all interested visitors.

The speaker on stage works for Alfa Bank, one of the biggest banks in Russia. The financial sector in the former Soviet block is taking as much interest in Bitcoin and, of course, blockchain technology as anywhere else is. Having skipped Russia’s second-biggest city for the past two years, Smile-Expo re-introduced its Eastern European conference tour in Saint Petersburg last Thursday.

“The event had over 600 visitors, 25 exhibitors and some 20 speakers. Four of those work for Russia’s largest financial institutions,” event organizer Pavol Likhomanov told Bitcoin Magazine. “Entrepreneurs and finance professionals are increasingly taking this technology seriously. This is evident from the turnup here in Saint Petersburg; and we’ve seen year-over-year growth in interest at our Moscow event as well.”

This interest is not necessarily self-evident. It was only in 2014 — indeed, around the time of the last Saint Petersburg conference — that Russia seemed to emerge as one of the most crypto-hostile nations on the globe. In an attempt to curb criminal activity, the Putin administration introduced draft legislation that would essentially ban any use of cryptocurrencies. Not much later, access to a number of Bitcoin websites, including bitcoin.org, was blocked in the country.

But so far, the proposed law has never actually been implemented.

“Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies still have no legal status in Russia,” Artem Tolkachev told Bitcoin Magazine. The director of Deloitte Russia’s legal services for technology projects was one of the headline speakers at the event, where the legal implications of blockchain technology represented a big chunk of the morning program.

“The central bank considers cryptocurrency like bitcoin a money surrogate, which is a progressive stance. But the Ministry of Finance is more conservative. They don’t like anything they don’t understand and cannot control,” he said. “And Russian policymakers are not always very open-minded. They prefer to have their own internet … their own currency.”

Needless to say, Bitcoin is not a great fit in such a worldview.

The Thaw

But the initial icy stance on digital currencies seems to be getting a bit less frosty these days.

It was only a couple of weeks ago that Russian president Vladimir Putin met Ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin at the International Economic Forum, also held in Saint Petersburg. In the widely reported event, within the crypto-sphere at least, the president was said to have “supported the idea of establishing ties with possible Russian partners” — referring to Buterin’s technology pitch.

The announcement has been interpreted as a sort of preliminary green light for Russian blockchain entrepreneurs and investors. While not quite an official endorsement from the Kremlin, let alone formal regulation, it’s been a hopeful sign nonetheless.

But until it’s official, Russian cryptocurrency users across the halls in the historic Vedensky Hotel, the site of last week’s event, remain reserved.

“The Russian market is volatile,” Timur, a former forex trader, told Bitcoin Magazine. He offers a platform that allows Russian brokers to trade on behalf of their clients, Russian cryptocurrency speculators. Speaking from his exhibit stand in Saint Petersburg, he explained: “We never know for sure if what’s accepted today will be legal tomorrow. Official policy could change at a whim.”

That’s why his company sets customers up with foreign bank accounts in Switzerland, or Lithuania, or maybe offshore. The coins themselves — bitcoin, litecoin, ether — never leave the exchange where they are traded.

And these exchanges are not in Russia either … at least not officially. Incorporating abroad is a typical strategy for Russians and their cryptocurrency startups.

Mining

It’s not just traders and the finance sector that are taking an interest. Bitcoin mining is growing in Russia too.

This is perhaps most evident from the rise of mining pool BitClub Network over the past months. While officially established outside of Russia, the team works from Kazan, a city to the east of Moscow. Already one of the biggest non-Chinese miners on the Bitcoin network, BitClub Network’s founder — he’s casually wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with an image of Putin — assured Bitcoin Magazine his will be a top-five pool by the end of the year. At least, that’s what one of his employees translated into English, his smartphone showing videos of data centers full of humming ASIC miners.

Russian miners are now setting up data centers such as these in the east of Russia, Alex of mining service provider MyRig told Bitcoin Magazine. “The temperature in Irkoetsk, for example, is ideal for Bitcoin mining: it can be -40 degrees Celsius. Meanwhile, electricity is cheap. There’s a big raw material industry, but with the crisis, some factories are out of use. With energy to spare, miners are starting to fill that void.”

MyRig, a rebranding of Bitmain Warranty (not to be confused with Bitmain), is not the only mining business at the Saint Petersburg conference. The company is vying for attention with several competitors in one of the exhibition rooms. One of them sells entire containers full of equipment, not unlike BitFury’s mobile data centers. Another is re-selling Antminers, the best-selling Bitmain machines.

“But to mine bitcoin in Russia at scale, you do still need to have the right connections,” Alex continues. “If you don’t know your way around local policymakers you risk being shut down.” Though with the increase in profits that the mining sector has seen over the past half year or so, the “big dicks” are entering the space, Alex said. “The guys with lots of money — and lots of connections. I’d expect mining in Russia to continue to grow significantly over the next year.”

And official regulation should be coming too, Deloitte’s Tolkachev said. A draft bill for cryptocurrency should be introduced within a few months, and could be approved by early 2018. This could bring some much-desired regulatory clarity for Russians wanting to open cryptocurrency-related businesses and otherwise openly engage in the industry without needing to work around the existing legal structure.

That is, visitors in the Vedensky Hotel generally seemed to agree, unless Putin changes his mind.

The post Russia's Crypto-Winter Shows Signs of Thaw in Saint Petersburg appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine.

Russia's Crypto-Winter Shows Signs of Thaw in Saint Petersburg

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

stpetersburg.jpg

A mixed crowd of denim jeans and custom-tailored suits, typical for crypto-events, is standing across the vertical aisle of the the main conference area at the Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference in Saint Petersburg, blocking the line of sight for those lucky enough to have snatched themselves a chair in the back. The hall, while spacious — high ceiling, tall arched windows partly covered with ASIC mining billboards — still isn’t quite large enough to fit all interested visitors.

The speaker on stage works for Alfa Bank, one of the biggest banks in Russia. The financial sector in the former Soviet block is taking as much interest in Bitcoin and, of course, blockchain technology as anywhere else is. Having skipped Russia’s second-biggest city for the past two years, Smile-Expo re-introduced its Eastern European conference tour in Saint Petersburg last Thursday.

“The event had over 600 visitors, 25 exhibitors and some 20 speakers. Four of those work for Russia’s largest financial institutions,” event organizer Pavol Likhomanov told Bitcoin Magazine. “Entrepreneurs and finance professionals are increasingly taking this technology seriously. This is evident from the turnup here in Saint Petersburg; and we’ve seen year-over-year growth in interest at our Moscow event as well.”

This interest is not necessarily self-evident. It was only in 2014 — indeed, around the time of the last Saint Petersburg conference — that Russia seemed to emerge as one of the most crypto-hostile nations on the globe. In an attempt to curb criminal activity, the Putin administration introduced draft legislation that would essentially ban any use of cryptocurrencies. Not much later, access to a number of Bitcoin websites, including bitcoin.org, was blocked in the country.

But so far, the proposed law has never actually been implemented.

“Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies still have no legal status in Russia,” Artem Tolkachev told Bitcoin Magazine. The director of Deloitte Russia’s legal services for technology projects was one of the headline speakers at the event, where the legal implications of blockchain technology represented a big chunk of the morning program.

“The central bank considers cryptocurrency like bitcoin a money surrogate, which is a progressive stance. But the Ministry of Finance is more conservative. They don’t like anything they don’t understand and cannot control,” he said. “And Russian policymakers are not always very open-minded. They prefer to have their own internet … their own currency.”

Needless to say, Bitcoin is not a great fit in such a worldview.

The Thaw

But the initial icy stance on digital currencies seems to be getting a bit less frosty these days.

It was only a couple of weeks ago that Russian president Vladimir Putin met Ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin at the International Economic Forum, also held in Saint Petersburg. In the widely reported event, within the crypto-sphere at least, the president was said to have “supported the idea of establishing ties with possible Russian partners” — referring to Buterin’s technology pitch.

The announcement has been interpreted as a sort of preliminary green light for Russian blockchain entrepreneurs and investors. While not quite an official endorsement from the Kremlin, let alone formal regulation, it’s been a hopeful sign nonetheless.

But until it’s official, Russian cryptocurrency users across the halls in the historic Vedensky Hotel, the site of last week’s event, remain reserved.

“The Russian market is volatile,” Timur, a former forex trader, told Bitcoin Magazine. He offers a platform that allows Russian brokers to trade on behalf of their clients, Russian cryptocurrency speculators. Speaking from his exhibit stand in Saint Petersburg, he explained: “We never know for sure if what’s accepted today will be legal tomorrow. Official policy could change at a whim.”

That’s why his company sets customers up with foreign bank accounts in Switzerland, or Lithuania, or maybe offshore. The coins themselves — bitcoin, litecoin, ether — never leave the exchange where they are traded.

And these exchanges are not in Russia either … at least not officially. Incorporating abroad is a typical strategy for Russians and their cryptocurrency startups.

Mining

It’s not just traders and the finance sector that are taking an interest. Bitcoin mining is growing in Russia too.

This is perhaps most evident from the rise of mining pool BitClub Network over the past months. While officially established outside of Russia, the team works from Kazan, a city to the east of Moscow. Already one of the biggest non-Chinese miners on the Bitcoin network, BitClub Network’s founder — he’s casually wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with an image of Putin — assured Bitcoin Magazine his will be a top-five pool by the end of the year. At least, that’s what one of his employees translated into English, his smartphone showing videos of data centers full of humming ASIC miners.

Russian miners are now setting up data centers such as these in the east of Russia, Alex of mining service provider MyRig told Bitcoin Magazine. “The temperature in Irkoetsk, for example, is ideal for Bitcoin mining: it can be -40 degrees Celsius. Meanwhile, electricity is cheap. There’s a big raw material industry, but with the crisis, some factories are out of use. With energy to spare, miners are starting to fill that void.”

MyRig, a rebranding of Bitmain Warranty (not to be confused with Bitmain), is not the only mining business at the Saint Petersburg conference. The company is vying for attention with several competitors in one of the exhibition rooms. One of them sells entire containers full of equipment, not unlike BitFury’s mobile data centers. Another is re-selling Antminers, the best-selling Bitmain machines.

“But to mine bitcoin in Russia at scale, you do still need to have the right connections,” Alex continues. “If you don’t know your way around local policymakers you risk being shut down.” Though with the increase in profits that the mining sector has seen over the past half year or so, the “big dicks” are entering the space, Alex said. “The guys with lots of money — and lots of connections. I’d expect mining in Russia to continue to grow significantly over the next year.”

And official regulation should be coming too, Deloitte’s Tolkachev said. A draft bill for cryptocurrency should be introduced within a few months, and could be approved by early 2018. This could bring some much-desired regulatory clarity for Russians wanting to open cryptocurrency-related businesses and otherwise openly engage in the industry without needing to work around the existing legal structure.

That is, visitors in the Vedensky Hotel generally seemed to agree, unless Putin changes his mind.

The post Russia's Crypto-Winter Shows Signs of Thaw in Saint Petersburg appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine.

TECH STOCKS SELL-OFF: Here's what you need to know

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Broken Phone

Tech stocks including Microsoft, Facebook, and Apple sold off on Tuesday, as the Nasdaq fell the most among the three main indexes. Alphabet fell 2.2% after EU antitrust regulators slapped the tech giant with a record-breaking fine.

Here's the scoreboard: 

  • Dow: 21,357.05, -52.50, (-0.25%)
  • S&P 500: 2,424.67, -14.40, (-0.59%)
  • Nasdaq: 6,162.51, -84.64, (-1.35%)
  • US 10-year bond yield: 2.205% (+0.068)
    1. The European Commission hit Google with a record-breaking €2.4 billion ($2.7 billion) fine in an antitrust case. It accused Google of abusing its dominant position and promoting its own shopping service in its search results over those of its competitors.
    2. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said she did not believe there would be another financial crisis soon. " I do think we're much safer and I hope that it will not be in our lifetimes and I don't believe it will be," she said at an event in London. 
    3. "The stock market seems to be running pretty much on fumes," said John Williams, the San Francisco Fed president, in an interview on Sydney's ABC News affiliate. Williams said he did not believe that any of President Donald Trump's fiscal policies, hopes of which have propped up the market, will begin to affect the economy until 2018 or 2019.
    4. Warren Buffett made a big investment in Store Capital Monday, which led to a downgrade from a Wall Street investment bank. "After today's +11% move, we think STOR is fairly valued and are downgrading the stock to Neutral," said Mizuho's Haendel St. Juste in a note. 
    5. Deutsche Bank could be staring down a $60 million loss after a bad bet on inflation, Bloomberg reportedThe German lender's supervisory board is reportedly investigating whether traders flouted risk limits on derivatives trades tied to US inflation, generating concerns over the strength of the company's risk controls.

Additionally:

There are 'cracks emerging' in the calmest market in years

MORGAN STANLEY: Here's why it makes sense for Tesla to become the next big music-streaming service

UBS: Here are the 9 most crowded stocks

Something called Ethereum is suddenly all over the news — here's what the bitcoin rival is all about

House Republicans' favorite biotech investment just plunged by 90%

Facebook has officially hit 2 billion users

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: An economist explains what could happen if Trump pulls the US out of NAFTA

Today’s huge ransomware attack has only made about $7,500 so far

TechCrunch, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

 Ransomware attacks are bigger than ever, but the payouts appear to be shrinking. While the ransomware suspected to be a variant of Petya makes headlines around the world, whoever set it loose isn’t really making a whole lot of money, especially if they paid for the software to begin with. At the time of writing, the Bitcoin address that today’s global attack points to has only… Read More

Bitcoin Exchange Operator Sentenced to Five-and-a-Half Years in Prison

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

The former operator of the now-defunct bitcoin exchange Coin.mx has been sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison.

Source

Something called Ethereum is suddenly all over the news — here's what those headlines are about

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Screen Shot 2017 06 27 at 9.51.31 AM

Just when you thought you had your head around bitcoin, along comes Ethereum.

The word has been in a lot of headlines lately — as the cryptocurrency world's new favorite thing soared in value. To be more specific, the price of something called an ether token is up over 3,000%.

Bitcoin, which is far more widely known as an alternative 'currency', is up about 141% so far this year. 

But what exactly are ether tokens and Ethereum? And how is it different than bitcoin? We've broken it down for you. 

Is it just like Bitcoin?

The reason you've been hearing about bitcoin for years, but Ethereum only recently is that the latter was only developed two years ago while bitcoin's been around for almost eight years. Ethereum was created by Vitalik Buterin, a young programmer who was told about bitcoin by his father and decided to create a platform for smart contracts; which bitcoin is not designed to do. The Moscow native began working on Ethereum after he dropped out of college, according to CNBC.

Ether tokens and bitcoin are called cryptocurrencies because they can be only be bought and sold digitally, are used to pay for things (including pre-school tuition), and because they fall outside of the control of central banks and other government entities that might control a national currency.

They're b
uilt on a technology called blockchain. That's a kind of ledger that records and verifies transactions made on it. All transactions made on these so-called decentralized networks are public and not controlled by one governing entity. Lately, the idea that both sides of a party — say two banks that buy and sell shares from each other — can get an accurate and verifiable record of the transaction instantly, has gripped Wall Street and other institutions as something at can be used in lots of ways.

There are multiple ways you can acquire ether tokens. You can buy them on an exchange just like you would any investment. Or you can use a computer to "mine" for them by solving complex math problems using computer software. These math problems get more complex as more coins are mined, in order to control the supply.

There's a key difference between ethereum and bitcoin. Bitcoin was designed to be a currency from the start. 

But Buterin conceived of Ethereum as a platform on which two parties could enter into a contract without a third party, according to Paul McNeal, a Bitcoin Evangelist and long-time cryptocurrency investor.

These so-called smart contracts create trust between two parties. The Ethereum platform is powered by ether tokens, according to The Huffington Post, and can be used as both a currency and can "represent virtual shares, assets, proof of membership, and more." Its numerous applications are partially responsible for its popularity and recent rise.

Gaining Steam

Screen Shot 2017 06 27 at 11.22.47 AMIn June, Ethereum was positioned to surpass bitcoin as the world's largest cryptocurrency by market cap, according to Coindesk. Ether currently trades at $233, but in mid-June it was trading at nearly $400. It's market value got close to 82% of bitcoin's. That number has since shrunk to less than 70%.

Its upward march was underpinned by a spike in interest by big Wall Street and tech firms into the cryptocurrency. According to Coindesk, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, and a number of other firms joined forces in February to create the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The collaborative venture aims to use the Ethereum platform to integrate blockchain solutions into their infrastructures. 

survey recently cited by Nathaniel Popper in The New York Times indicates that business are far more bullish on Ether, and the future usage of ethereum, than bitcoin. Almost 94% of surveyed firms said they feel positive about the state of Ether tokens. Only 49% of firms surveyed had a positive feeling about bitcoin. 

MGT Capital, the company run by John McAfee, is one such firm. It said it would start to mine Ethereum in its latest bid to turn a profit. "We are more convinced each day of the growth and value of digital currencies, and our company is uniquely positioned to be a leading provider of processing power to relevant blockchains," McAfee said in a statement.

SEE ALSO: A petition on Change.org is calling on Amazon to accept bitcoin 'ASAP'

SEE ALSO: CONSULTING FIRM TO WALL STREET: Don't worry about blockchain's cost — just start working with it

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: JIM ROGERS: I like depressed markets like Russia, China, and Japan

FBI: Hackers Extorted $28 Million in Cryptocurrencies Last Year

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

FBI report on cryptcurrencies and hackers

On June 22, the Federal Bureau of Investigation presented its annual Internet Crime Report for the year of 2016. The FBI analyzed the victim reports at the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) and used the information from their database to publish the annual study. It is important to mention that, according to the Department of Justice’s research, only an estimated 15 percent of the U.S. fraud victims reported their crimes to law enforcement.

The FBI highlighted multiple “hot topics” regarding internet crimes for the year of 2016. This included Business Email Compromise (BEC), which resulted in the loss of $360 million from victims, currently standing in first place in the category of most damage caused. BEC is a sophisticated scam targeting companies working with international or foreign businesses or suppliers who conduct wire transfer payments at regular intervals.

Ransomware, an emerging “business form” among cyber criminals, was specially mentioned in the report. When launching such attacks, the hackers target electronic devices — mostly computers and laptops — with malware that locks up the data of the machines. After the criminals successfully breach the systems of the victims, they demand ransom from them. According to the FBI, in most cases, the ransom is paid in digital currencies, such as bitcoin. In 2016, the IC3 identified 2,673 complaints connected to ransomware attacks, with an estimated loss of over $2.4 million.

Another featured sort of internet crime was tech support fraud demanding approximately $7.8 million from the victims. The scam occurs when the criminals impersonate technical support agents from a computer software, security, cable or internet company. After the hackers get in contact with the victims, they convince them to provide remote access to their devices. Once the criminals have control over their systems, additional criminal activity occurs. Multiple companies, including Microsoft and Mozilla, alerted their customers on their websites regarding such fraudulent activities.

The IC3 recorded 17,146 cases of extortion with losses over $15 million, which occurred using the internet. By the FBI’s description, in extortion cases, cyber criminals “demand something of a value from a victim by threatening physical or financial harm or the release of sensitive data.” The agency identified various forms of the crime, including denial of service attacks, hitman schemes, “sextortion,” government impersonation schemes, loan schemes and high-profile data breaches. According to the FBI, cyber criminals often demand the payments in cryptocurrencies from the victims, which provides the perpetrators an additional layer of security since they are easy to send but harder to trace.

Compared to the previous year, the number of reported internet crime cases increased by 3.7 percent in 2016, with the damage caused to the victims rising by $380 million. Excluding the United States, the top five countries affected by internet crime are ranked in the following order: Canada (3,722 cases), India (2,188 cases), the United Kingdom (1,509 cases), Australia (936 cases) and France (568 cases). Among the states of the U.S., California had the most victims (39,547) followed by Texas (21,441) and Florida (21,068).

The FBI also compared the age groups affected by internet crime. Victims aged above 60 had the most damage ($339 million) and the most cases (55,043). People between the ages of 30 and 39 had the second most cases (54,670); however, they lost only 56 percent ($190 million) to the criminals compared to those over 60. Young persons under the age of 20 had both the least amount of cases (10,004) and damage ($6.7 million).

ic3-2016-internet-crime-report-highlights-infographic-2.jpg


The post FBI: Hackers Extorted $28 Million in Cryptocurrencies Last Year appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine.

A massive new ransomware attack is spreading around the globe

TechCrunch, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

 A month after the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed connected systems worldwide, a new threat appears to be spreading quickly. As reports emerge, today’s attack paints a picture of businesses and governments around the world held hostage by a second major wave of ransomware, a kind of software that hijacks computerized systems and demands payment, often in bitcoin, to unlock… Read More

The Risks of Segregated Witness: Problems Under US Contract Law

CoinDesk, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Jimmy Nguyen of nChain provides an opinion on possible legal issues with the SegWit scaling proposal should it activate on bitcoin's network.

Source

10 things you need to know in markets today

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Arlene Foster and Theresa May

Good morning! Here's what you need to know in markets on Tuesday.

1. Theresa May has signed a £1.5 billion deal with Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party in order to prop up her minority Conservative government, the BBC reports. The deal, which comes two weeks after the election resulted in a hung Parliament, will see the 10 DUP MPs back the Tories in key Commons votes.

2. The threat of a global trade war was growing last night after the European Union promised to retaliate if the Continent’s producers became “collateral damage” in measures to protect the American steel industry by classifying it as a matter of national security, the Times reports.

3. New data show consumer confidence has slumped in the wake of the UK's hung parliament, and is only marginally higher than it was in the immediate aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the European Union. The latest Consumer Confidence Index results show consumer confidence fell from 109.1 in the week before the election to 105.2 in the week afterwards.

4. The price of gold tumbled yesterday after a huge spike in New York futures volumes that traders attributed to an inadvertent “fat-finger” order, the Times reports. The sale of 18,500 lots of gold, totalling 1.85 million ounces, in only a minute sent the price falling by as much as 1.6% to $1,236.43 an ounce, the lowest since the middle of last month.

5. The sale of the Co-operative Bank has been scrapped as bailout talks with the troubled lender’s backers intensify, the Times reports. The hedge funds that own 80% of the bank are in talks with the Co-operative Group, the minority shareholder, over splitting the Co-op Group’s pension scheme, which had proved an obstacle for the bank’s sale.

6. Japan's Nikkei share average edged up to hover near two-year highs on Tuesday morning as a weaker yen helped exporters rise, while financial stocks rebounded from Monday's declines, Reuters reports. The Nikkei gained 0.4% to 20,233.23 in midmorning trade after hitting as high as 20,250.10 earlier. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan stood flat.

7. Crude oil futures were largely unchanged in early Asian trade on Tuesday as the market took a breather following three days of gains with a supply glut keeping a lid on prices, Reuters reports. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 2 cents at $43.36 per barrel by 1.19 a.m. BST (8.19 p.m. Monday ET) and Brent crude futures were flat at $45.83 per barrel.

8. The euro retraced its Monday gains after ECB's Draghi defended the central bank's easy monetary policy, Reuters reports. Draghi said on Monday that super low rates create jobs, foster growth and benefit borrowers, ultimately easing inequality. He also rejected calls to exit super easy monetary policy quickly, arguing that premature tightening would lead to a fresh recession and more inequality.

9. Cryptocurrency Bitcoin had a rough start to the week It's a rough start to the week for bitcoin. The cryptocurrency trades down 10.11% on Monday, at $2,275 a coin, a one-week low. The action seems to be a continuation of the selling that developed on Wednesday, when rival Ethereum flash-crashed from $296 to 10 cents before recovering its losses.

10. Bank of England governor Mark Carney delivers the central bank's twice-yearly Financial Stability Report today. It covers an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the financial system and the risks to stability, and the Financial Policy Committee’s view on the outlook for the stability of the UK financial system.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: These are the watches worn by the smartest and most powerful men in the world

Bitcoin Price Analysis: Bear Run Shows No Decrease in Momentum

Bitcoin Magazine, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

Bitcoin Price Analysis

Over the weekend, BTC-USD market cap dropped from $45 billion to a current (and still falling) market cap of $39 billion. BTC-USD brought the entire crypto market to a screeching halt as traders continued to see devaluations in nearly every tradable coin on the market. So, let’s take a look at what has happened and see just how bad this dive will be for BTC-USD and the other cryptocurrencies.

On a macro scale, BTC-USD has been in the process of making a massive Head-and-Shoulders (H&S) pattern on the 6-hour candles:

BTC Macro HS.png

Figure 1: BTC-USD, 6HR Candles, GDAX

Head and Shoulders are common, highly predictable market reversal patterns. They have well-defined criteria for price movement and price projections once the pattern breaks to the bottom. A H&S pattern is characterized by the following, illustrated above:

  1. There is typically an ascending trend line;

  2. A left shoulder that is smaller than a central peak (head) and a right shoulder that is smaller than the central peak;

  3. The two shoulders are connected by the “Neck Line” of the Head and Shoulders.

  4. There is first a test of the ascending trendline. A test and rejection of the ascending trend line’s support will bring us to the test of the neck line.

  5. A test of the neck line is usually the ultimate deciding condition for whether or not the pattern will continue downward.

At the time of this article, BTC-USD has broken the ascending trend line and is in the process of testing the Neck Line of the H&S pattern. If condition #5 is broken, the price projections are calculated in the figure below:

BTC Macro HS Price Target.png

Figure 2: BTC-USD, 6HR Candles, GDAX, Price Target for Head and Shoulders

Price targets are not guarantees of price movement. Rather, a price target should be used as more of a target “zone” rather than a discrete point in the price-space. In our case, BTC-USD happens to have a price target with a very reliable, major support line in the $1800s. Whether BTC-USD drops that far down remains to be seen. However, it is important to note the following in the figure below:

BTC Macro HS no volume.png

Figure 3: BTC-USD, 6HR Candles, GDAX, Steady Downward Momentum

  1. The momentum indicators, RSI and MACD, are showing no sign of downward momentum loss;

  2. The steady downward momentum is coupled with very little relative buy-back volume.

During previous bearish periods, there was a significant increase in buy volume. However, something we are not seeing in this current bear run is a volume increase. The market could reverse at any point (after all this is crypto!), but on all major long-term scales, the momentum indicators show no sign of slowing down.

If we break the Neck Line of the Head and Shoulders, below are the major support lines you can expect BTC-USD to rest on during its downward spiral:

BTC Macro HS Fib Lines.png

Figure 4: BTC-USD, 6HR Candles, GDAX, Fibonacci Retracement Levels

At the time of this article, the market is testing the 38% Fibonacci Retracement Level, but the market doesn’t appear to be interested in buying at these values. If the BTC markets don’t see an increase in volume, BTC-USD will continue to hemorrhage in value — as will the entire crypto-market.

Summary:
  1. BTC-USD completed a Head and Shoulders pattern that brought the entire crypto-market into a Bear Market.

  2. Current price projection based on Fibonacci Levels and Head and Shoulders price target has BTC-USD on a course for the $1800s.

The post Bitcoin Price Analysis: Bear Run Shows No Decrease in Momentum appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine.

IBM landed a big win in the race to sell blockchain to Wall Street

Business Insider, 1/1/0001 12:00 AM PST

President and CEO of IBM Ginni Rometty takes part in a strategic and policy CEO discussion with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Eisenhower Execution Office Building in Washington, U.S., April 11, 2017.

IBM has been selected to build a new blockchain-based international trading system for a consortium of global banks, a major win for the tech giant in the race to sell blockchain to Wall Street.

Deutsche Bank, HSBC, KBC, Natixis, Rabobank, Société Générale and UniCredit announced in January that they were banding together to build a "Digital Trade Chain (DTC)," a blockchain-based trade finance platform. 

International trade is currently a convoluted process where most involved can't see the whole process, instead only dealing with one other party in a complex supply chain. 

DTC will use the same technology that underpins digital currency bitcoin to connects all parties involved in international trade — buyers, sellers, transporters, banks financing the deals, and so on. The hope is that this leads to more financing for people lower down the chain as banks can be confident seeing the end buyer is good for the money.

IBM announced on Tuesday that it has been selected by the consortium to build DTC, following what it calls "a global competitive bidding process."

Marie Wieck, IBM Blockchain's general manager, says in a release: "In working with hundreds of clients around the world on a diverse range of blockchain projects, trade finance has emerged as one of the strongest use cases for the technology."

The contract is a significant win for IBM as it means the tech company's blockchain platform — dubbed Hyperledger Fabric — will be used to build the system. That likely means lucrative servicing contracts for IBM and may make banking execs more likely to commission more Hyperledger-based products and services once they're familiar with the system.

Rudi Peeters, CIO at KBC, says in a release announcing the deal: "Their blockchain and banking industry expertise will help us create a new platform for small and medium businesses in Europe that can enable them for faster, easier and cheaper trade transactions."

IBM's Hyperledger Fabric is one of three main blockchain-based systems vying to become the next-generation "operating system" for financial services. R3, a startup set up by Wall Street veteran David Rutter, has developed blockchain-inspired platform Corda.

Finance executives are also exploring the possibility of using open source blockchain Ethereum as a platform for products. JPMorgan, UBS, and Credit Suisse were all founding members of the Ethereum Enterprise Alliance (EEA), a group looking to develop best practice standards for building on Ethereum.

Blockchain, also known as distributed ledger technology, is a form of shared database that is policed using complex cryptography to ensure that it can only be edited when the majority of participants on the network have approved. The technology was first developed to underpin digital currency bitcoin as it removes the need for a central bank or authority to police the currency.

Banks around the world have been talking about the potential of blockchain to transform finance for several years. The inbuilt security and trust checks allow banks to potentially cut out middlemen in processes like settlement and clearing, deal directly with each other rather than working through third parties. This would cuts costs. Santander estimated in a 2015 report that the technology could collectively save banks as much as $20 billion per year.

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